Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams

Over 14 Million have viewed this video.

Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch (Oct. 23, 1960 – July 25, 2008) gave his last lecture at the university Sept. 18, 2007, before a packed McConomy Auditorium. In his moving presentation, “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams,” Pausch talked about his lessons learned and gave advice to students on how to achieve their own career and personal goals.

Posted in Creativity, self-improvement, spiritually, thought provoking | Leave a comment

James Cameron: Before Avatar … a curious boy

James Cameron’s big-budget (and even bigger-grossing) films create unreal worlds all their own. In this personal talk, he reveals his childhood fascination with the fantastic — from reading science fiction to deep-sea diving — and how it ultimately drove the success of his blockbuster hits “Aliens,” “The Terminator,” “Titanic” and “Avatar.” 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Andrew Stanton: The clues to a great story

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton (“Toy Story,” “WALL-E”) shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning. 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Legendary blues singer Etta James will be remembered

The matriarch of the blues, Etta James, whose iconic songs include At Last, and Something’s Got A Hold On Me, has died in southern California.

Her manager, Lupe De Leon, said the singer died early Friday at Riverside Community Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 73. De Leon said the cause of death was complications of leukemia.

“It’s a tremendous loss for her fans around the world,” De Leon said. “She’ll be missed. A great American singer. Her music defied category.”

“Etta James was a pioneer. Her ever-changing sound has influenced rock and roll, rhythm and blues, pop, soul and jazz artists, marking her place as one of the most important female artists of our time,” said Rock and Roll Hall of Fame President and CEO Terry Stewart. “From Janis Joplin to Joss Stone, an incredible number of performers owe their debts to her. There is no mistaking the voice of Etta James, and it will live forever.”

Despite the reputation she cultivated, she would always be remembered best for At Last. The jazz-inflected rendition wasn’t the original, but it would become the most famous and the song that would define her as a legendary singer. Over the decades, brides used it as their song down the aisle and car companies to hawk their wares, and it filtered from one generation to the next through its inclusion in movies like American Pie. Perhaps most famously, U.S. President Barack Obama and the first lady danced to a version at his inauguration ball.

The tender, sweet song belied the turmoil in her personal life. James – born Jamesetta Hawkins – was born in Los Angeles to a mother whom she described as a scam artist, a substance abuser and a fleeting presence during her youth. She never knew her father, although she was told – and had believed – that he was the famous billiards player Minnesota Fats. He neither confirmed nor denied it: when they met, he simply told her: “I don’t remember everything. I wish I did, but I don’t.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Leonard Cohen on “Hallelujah”

This is a short clip from a much longer interview. Here he talks about arguably his most famous song.“Hallelujah” written by Leonard Cohen was first released on Cohen’s studio album Various Positions in 1984. While initially the song had limited success it found greater popular acclaim through a cover by John Cale in 1991, which later formed the basis for a cover by Jeff Buckley. In recent years “Hallelujah” has been performed by almost 200 artists in various languages.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Morley sings “Women of Hope”

Inspired by Aung San Suu Kyi’s call to action, “If you’re feeling helpless, help someone,” Morley composed this song. She sings it at TEDxWomen in her gorgeous, warm voice.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Jane Fonda: Life’s third act

Within this generation, an extra 30 years have been added to our life expectancy — and these years aren’t just a footnote or a pathology. At TEDxWomen, Jane Fonda asks how we can think about this new phase of our lives.

Why you should listen to her:

Jane Fonda is an actor, author, producer, activist and exercise guru. Outspoken and committed, she supports environmental issues, peace, and female empowerment. She founded the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention, and established the Jane Fonda Center for Adolescent Reproductive Health at the Emory School of Medicine. She cofounded the Women’s Media Center, and sits on the board of V-Day: Until The Violence Stops, a global effort to stop violence against women and girls. She is a former Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Population Fund.

Jane’s remarkable screen and stage career includes two Best Actress Oscars, an Emmy, a Tony Award nomination and an Honorary Palme d’Or from the Cannes Film Festival—she is one of only three people to receive this honor. Off stage, she revolutionized the fitness industry in the 1980s with Jane Fonda’s Workout—the all time top-grossing home video. She has written a best-selling memoir, My Life So Far, and Prime Time, a comprehensive guide to living life to the fullest, particularly for boomers.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Benjamin Zander on music and passion


Benjamin Zander has two infectious passions: classical music, and helping us all realize our untapped love for it — and by extension, our untapped love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections.

Since 1979, Benjamin Zander has been the conductor of the Boston Philharmonic. He is known around the world as both a guest conductor and a speaker on leadership — and he’s been known to do both in a single performance. He uses music to help people open their minds and create joyful harmonies that bring out the best in themselves and their colleagues.

His provocative ideas about leadership are rooted in a partnership with Rosamund Stone Zander, with whom he co-wrote The Art of Possibility.

“Arguably the most accessible communicator about classical music since Leonard Bernstein, Zander moves audiences with his unbridled passion and enthusiasm.”

Sue Fox, London Sunday Times

Posted in Music, Thought-Provoking TED Talk Videos, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

TED Talk: Dan Dennett, on our consciousness

Why We Should Listen to This Speaker:                                                                                     One of our most important living philosophers, Dan Dennett is best known for his provocative and controversial arguments that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes in the brain. He argues that the brain’s computational circuitry fools us into thinking we know more than we do, and that what we call consciousness — isn’t.                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                          Philosopher Dan Dennett makes a compelling argument that not only don’t we understand our own consciousness, but that half the time our brains are actively fooling us

Posted in Thought-Provoking TED Talk Videos, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dan Gilbert asks, Why are we happy?

ABOUT THIS TALK                                                                                                                       Dan Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness, challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want.

Our “psychological immune system” lets us feel truly happy even when things don’t go as planned.

Posted in self-improvement, Thought-Provoking TED Talk Videos | Leave a comment