How to Change Education – from the ground up Prof Ken Robinson – full lecture

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T S ELIOT: Where is the Life we have lost in living?

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T. S. Eliot in 1934 (WikiPedia)

Where is the Life we have lost in living?
Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
The cycles of Heaven in twenty centuries
Bring us farther from God and nearer to the Dust. —T. S. Eliot, “Two Choruses from the Rock”

Q Haven’t we taken at least two steps further down since Eliot wrote this?

Where is the information we have lost in data?
Where is the data we have lost in the virtual?
Where is the virtual we have lost in Facebook? -
suggested addendum by Roger Prentice – what would yours be?

TAGS: T S Eliot, knowledge, wisdom, data, information, the virtual, Facebook, God, Life, oblivion, degeneration

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Plato’s Cave , the line, the four stages and justice

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Hi Everyone

In our One Garden Interspirituality group we had a great discussion – or at least started a great dialogue around this question – Q. How does Plato’s cave allegory relate to what we know of the interspiritual teachings of Tolle, Zen, Christian, Baha’i etc?

1 This here is useful – http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_cave – because it helps re the ‘line’ and the ‘four stages’ – which weren’t fully clear in our dialogue.

The allegory describes Plato’s conception of reality. Humans appreciate every day objects through our senses, however, those objects are only "shadows" of the true "Forms", a concept Plato develops throughout his writings. Knowledge of the forms is the equivalent in the allegory of being released from the cave and seeing the world itself rather than shadows of the world.


Deeper analysis

Plato essentially believed that there are four "levels" of knowledge. Speaking allegorically, the first one is…

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Tomorrow’s Spirituality – Ken Wilber & Father Thomas Keating

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The Catholic theologian Karl Rahner famously said "the Christian of tomorrow will be a mystic, or not a Christian at all." Few people have impacted Christianity in this regard as has Fr. Thomas Keating. A Cistercian monk from St. Benedict’s Monastery in Snowmass, Colorado, Fr. Thomas has spent a lifetime in deep Christian practice, and in sharing the fruits of this contemplation with countless others. We were enormously blessed to host a dialogue with Fr. Thomas and Ken Wilber in April of 2006. In today’s featured video, Ken presents some of the foundational concepts of Integral spirituality.

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Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams

Over 14 Million have viewed this video.

Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch (Oct. 23, 1960 – July 25, 2008) gave his last lecture at the university Sept. 18, 2007, before a packed McConomy Auditorium. In his moving presentation, “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams,” Pausch talked about his lessons learned and gave advice to students on how to achieve their own career and personal goals.

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James Cameron: Before Avatar … a curious boy

James Cameron’s big-budget (and even bigger-grossing) films create unreal worlds all their own. In this personal talk, he reveals his childhood fascination with the fantastic — from reading science fiction to deep-sea diving — and how it ultimately drove the success of his blockbuster hits “Aliens,” “The Terminator,” “Titanic” and “Avatar.” 

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Andrew Stanton: The clues to a great story

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton (“Toy Story,” “WALL-E”) shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning. 

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Legendary blues singer Etta James will be remembered

The matriarch of the blues, Etta James, whose iconic songs include At Last, and Something’s Got A Hold On Me, has died in southern California.

Her manager, Lupe De Leon, said the singer died early Friday at Riverside Community Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 73. De Leon said the cause of death was complications of leukemia.

“It’s a tremendous loss for her fans around the world,” De Leon said. “She’ll be missed. A great American singer. Her music defied category.”

“Etta James was a pioneer. Her ever-changing sound has influenced rock and roll, rhythm and blues, pop, soul and jazz artists, marking her place as one of the most important female artists of our time,” said Rock and Roll Hall of Fame President and CEO Terry Stewart. “From Janis Joplin to Joss Stone, an incredible number of performers owe their debts to her. There is no mistaking the voice of Etta James, and it will live forever.”

Despite the reputation she cultivated, she would always be remembered best for At Last. The jazz-inflected rendition wasn’t the original, but it would become the most famous and the song that would define her as a legendary singer. Over the decades, brides used it as their song down the aisle and car companies to hawk their wares, and it filtered from one generation to the next through its inclusion in movies like American Pie. Perhaps most famously, U.S. President Barack Obama and the first lady danced to a version at his inauguration ball.

The tender, sweet song belied the turmoil in her personal life. James – born Jamesetta Hawkins – was born in Los Angeles to a mother whom she described as a scam artist, a substance abuser and a fleeting presence during her youth. She never knew her father, although she was told – and had believed – that he was the famous billiards player Minnesota Fats. He neither confirmed nor denied it: when they met, he simply told her: “I don’t remember everything. I wish I did, but I don’t.”

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Leonard Cohen on “Hallelujah”

This is a short clip from a much longer interview. Here he talks about arguably his most famous song.“Hallelujah” written by Leonard Cohen was first released on Cohen’s studio album Various Positions in 1984. While initially the song had limited success it found greater popular acclaim through a cover by John Cale in 1991, which later formed the basis for a cover by Jeff Buckley. In recent years “Hallelujah” has been performed by almost 200 artists in various languages.

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Morley sings “Women of Hope”

Inspired by Aung San Suu Kyi’s call to action, “If you’re feeling helpless, help someone,” Morley composed this song. She sings it at TEDxWomen in her gorgeous, warm voice.

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